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Photography Podcasts Travel

Paris: ‘Magical, Beautiful, and Mysterious’

When I “met” Paris at the tender age of 18, it was love at first sight.  She was magical, beautiful, and mysterious.  I fell under her spell and had no desire to break it, promising myself that I would return as frequently as possible!  I’ve been lucky enough to fulfill that promise, falling more in love with her on each visit.

Michelle Keel, Paris Gone By
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Photography

Peter Turnley: A photograph is an expression of life

While I receive a great form of joy from making a powerful photograph, I don’t think in terms of good and bad photographs-I actually somewhat despise those concepts because they are so much about photography-and I care so much more about life-a photograph simply being an expression of all that life can offer.

What I do care about his honoring life and our existence, and trying to make a declaration of life with the time I have on this earth.

Peter Turnley
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Photography

Why Photograph?

Pour moi la photographie c’est garder “ma capacité à m’émerveiller encore et toujours”.

Laurent Hochart

Translation: “For me, photography helps me to maintain my capacity to marvel forever and always.”

You can read other reasons people make photographs here.

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Photography

Why Photograph?

Photography is a true solace in my life and to work on projects that I’m passionate about is incredibly fulfilling.

* * *

Despite my chronic health issues (meaning I’m currently bed-bound), I’m extremely eager to connect with creative individuals.

Hannah Gimblett

You can see other reasons people make photographs here.

Categories
Photography

Why Photograph?

I had first picked up a camera at the age of seventeen, and photography immediately opened up my world. From the beginning, it was a way to show others what I cared about and a wonderful pretext for me to enter new worlds.

Peter Turnley, Parisians (2000)

You can see other reasons people make photographs here.

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History

Holocaust Revisionism: Very Much Alive 77 Years After WWII

Jan Grabowski, a professor of history at the University of Ottawa, writing in The New York Times:

Poland’s efforts to reframe history reflect a trend proliferating in other European countries to obfuscate the history of the Holocaust. In France, the far right has made efforts to whitewash the record of the Vichy government, which collaborated with the Nazis. In Hungary and Croatia, local complicity and collaboration during the war is downplayed, shifting the blame for the Jewish catastrophe entirely onto the German occupiers. What makes the Polish example so distinctive is the apparent scale of state official involvement in redirecting the narrative.

In all these cases, pushing blame for the destruction of Jewish communities entirely onto Nazi occupiers obfuscates the larger context of Holocaust horror and the very real problems of collaboration, bystanderism and local antisemitism that helped run the machine of the Holocaust.