Categories
History Photography

Washington, DC on High Alert

This is a tense period in the nation’s capital. Key institutions look like an armed camp. I have lived in Washington over 40 years and have never seen anything like this.

The Supreme Court is surrounded by a protective fence. © David H. Enzel, 2021
The Capitol is fenced off and protected by the US Army after the storming of the Capitol on January 6, 2021. The flag is at half mast because United States Capitol Police Officer Brian D. Sicknick passed away due to injuries sustained while on-duty during the attack. © David H. Enzel, 2021
At approximately 9:30 p.m. on January 7, 2021, United States Capitol Police Officer Brian D. Sicknick passed away due to injuries sustained while on-duty. Officer Sicknick was responding to the riots on Wednesday, January 6, 2021, at the U.S. Capitol and was injured while physically engaging with protesters. He returned to his division office and collapsed. He was taken to a local hospital where he succumbed to his injuries. The death of Officer Sicknick will be investigated by the Metropolitan Police Department’s Homicide Branch, the USCP, and other agencies. Officer Sicknick joined the USCP in July 2008, and most recently served in the Department’s First Responder’s Unit.© David H. Enzel, 2021
Categories
History Photography Travel

The Sheridan-Kalorama Neighborhood of DC

Art on Call, Washington, DC, Artist: Peter Waddell Photograph: © David H. Enzel, 2021

Yesterday, I was walking in the Sheridan-Kalorama neighborhood of Washington, DC. I stumbled across one of the many works of art in Washington’s abandoned police and fire call boxes. The project is called “Art on Call.” I have been making photos of these call boxes as I come across them. They have educated me about the city’s rich history.

This call box explains that three chief justices of the United States Supreme Court lived in Sheridan-Kalorama:

  • William Howard Taft, the 27th President of the United States was appointed Chief Justice by President Harding, after serving as President. Taft is the only person to have served in both of these offices. He lived at 2215 Wyoming Avenue.
  • Charles Evans Hughes, a U.S. Secretary of State and an unsuccessful candidate for President in 1916, became Chief Justice in 1930 and resided at 2223 R Street.
  • Harlan Fiske Stone, a U.S. Attorney General, occupied 1919 24th Street. during his tenure.

In addition, other prominent Supreme Court justices have lived in Sheridan-Kalorama including Louis Brandeis, Joseph McKenna and Sandra Day O’Connor, the first female justice of the Supreme Court.

The rendering of the Supreme Court in the call box is the creation of Peter Waddell, a native of New Zealand who came to Washington in 1992 and became a U.S. citizen in 2002. Waddell’s beautiful paintings focus on America’s history and architecture. Waddell’s view of the United States is inspiring.

The Sheridan-Kalorama neighborhood also includes a number of diplomatic residences, including the residence of the French ambassador at 2221 Kalorama Road, shown below.

The French ambassador’s residence in Washington, D.C. is located at 2221 Kalorama Road, N.W., in the Kalorama neighborhood of northwest Washington, D.C. The residence was built in 1910. © David H. Enzel, 2021

The Sheridan-Kalorama neighborhood is worth visiting.

Categories
Photography

2020 – Favorite Color Photos

Yesterday, I posted an album of my favorite black and white images from 2020. I don’t like mixing black and white and color images. So today I’m posting an album of my favorite color images from 2020.

Because of the pandemic, only one photo is from outside the Washington area. Early in 2020, I visited Chicago and saw Marc Chagall’s beautiful America Windows at the Art Institute of Chicago.

Although I missed traveling, I enjoyed exploring the Washington area, which has so much to offer.

Marc Chagall
Categories
Photography

Looking Back on 2020

I gathered in one album what I consider the best black and white images I made in 2020. Topics include Covid, the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in September, the dedication of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial, also in September, and the November election. Through it all Washington, DC remains a beautiful, inspirational city.

What will 2021 bring?

Washington, DC (2020)
Categories
History Travel

‘Art On Call’ – Washington, DC

From 2000 until 2009, Cultural Tourism DC led “Art on Call”, a city-wide effort to restore Washington’s abandoned police and fire call boxes as neighborhood artistic icons. Cultural Tourism DC partnered with the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities and the District Department of Transportation on this initiative. The project is now managed by the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities.

Art on Call
A selection of “Art on Call” in Washington, DC

Categories
Travel

Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial

The Memorial honors Dwight D. Eisenhower, the Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe during World War II and the 34th President of the United States. 

The Memorial is across the street from the National Air and Space Museum and is surrounded by the U.S. Department of Education, the Federal Aviation Administration, Voice of America, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in Southwest Washington.

Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial, Washington, DC © David H. Enzel, 2020

Architect Frank Gehry designed the Memorial. Gehry was born in Toronto in 1929 as Frank Owen Goldberg. His father was born in Brooklyn to Russian Jewish parents, and his mother was a Polish Jewish immigrant.

Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial, Washington, DC © David H. Enzel, 2020

Gehry’s design features three bronze statues of Eisenhower by the Russian-born sculptor Sergey Eylanbekov , one featuring General Eisenhower with troops from the 101st Airborne the day before the invasion of Normandy, another sculpture depicting President Eisenhower in the White House surrounded by civilian and military advisors, and a third portraying “Little Ike” in his boyhood.

The Memorial highlights passages from notable Eisenhower addresses. Framing the entire memorial is a stainless steel woven tapestry by artist Tomas Osinski , who was born in Poland. The tapestry depicts the cliffs at Pointe du Hoc on the Normandy coastline. Pointe du Hoc was the highest point between the American sector landings at Utah Beach to the west and Omaha Beach to the east. On D-Day, the United States Army Ranger Assault Group attacked and captured Pointe du Hoc after scaling the cliffs.

The Memorial was dedicated on September 17, 2020.

Eisenhower Memorial, Washington, DC (2020)
Eisenhower Memorial Album by David Enzel on Flickr.

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